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20130422
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and a house committee is set to look whether or not it should actually continue. chief correspondent jim angle is live in washington with more. hi, jim. >> reporter: hello, jenna. what started out as an effort to by ronald reagan to help people in rural areas to have a phone in case of emergencies what critics suspect is a new welfare program, listen. >> the cost has gone from $143 million a few years ago, to $2.2 billion today, a 15 times increase. >> reporter: now the cost of the program lept after cell phones were added in 2008. only those on low income programs such as welfare and food stamps legally qualify. but lawmakers say the program is out of control. >> i got a solicitation for a free phone at my apartment which is certainly not in a building where you're going to have people who are qualified for free phones. there is clearly money being wasted here. >> the fcc said in a recent year there were 270,000 beneficiaries that had more than one of these subsidized cell phones that is completely against the law right there. >> reporter: now funded by a small tax on all phone bills you can
delegation heads to washington this week. jim clancy has more. >> reporter: north korea's response to the call of diplomacy has been blustery at best. it demands the world recognize its nuclear and ballistic missile programs as its sovereign right.in exchange for even sitting down to talk >> kim jong un probably feeling very insecure and very unstable. and the more unstable and more insecure he feels, the more the need to hold on to, to cling onto this ultimate weapon of destruction, nuclear weapons. because this is the only thing that could ensure the continuation of the kim dynasty. >> reporter: the west hopes kim jong un's weeks-long propaganda outburst will cause china to make a fundamental shift in its support for pyongyang. that may be answered in a series of meetings in china and washington this week. >> if any country in the world has leverage in dealing with north korea and maybe to the point where north korea will be forced to actually give up, contemplate giving up on its nuclear weapons program, it's china. >> reporter: beijing's interest will be its own. it's about wha
as well. let's get jim in on this conversation, international chairman and ceo. jim, when i saw this, i thought, wait a minute, this is unbelievable considering that every casino i've ever been in, they want to keep you inside, not bring you outside. tell me what's at the heart of this idea. >> well, you're right. it's not your father's casino environment. this is to reflect the new consumer, the consumer is experienced samplelers. they want not to be told what to do, and we're building a park that will be the connective tissue between two iconic resorts already, new york new york and monte carlo. we're bringing danny meyers from shake shack out to las vegas for the first time, and we're building a brand new 20,000-seat arena that will anchor this park. so imagine an indoor/out experience where people can go around and not be told what to do, do what they want to do, and i think it's going to benefit the existing resorts we have. liz: and you've also got the hershey's chocolate world. i like chocolate so, of course, i totally -- [laughter] i completely focused on chocolate world. but i
have been on. i would like my son, jeff, and jim, the ceo of the west coast that have endured many battles. we share the property, share the privilege with boston properties and thank you for the opportunity to develop such a wonderful high quality energy efficient building that we are going to be so proud of. thank you for the opportunity. [ applause ] >> thank you, jerry, very much for those comments. now our final speaker is zuckerman. a man who needs no introduction and a man who i have a tremendous amount of respect for and incredible inspiration to me. he has worked his entire life in numerous capacity to make this a better world. a publishing magnet, he's the chairman and editor of the new york world world -- report and a regular commentator on the mclaunch group. the council or foreign releases and washington for studies and strategic studies and vice-chair of the international peace institute. he's also the vice chairman for the public schools and a past president of the board of trust ee financing for the cancer center in boston. he has helped in many areas in journali
witherspoon apparently had trouble walking the line. her and husband jim tot were arrested and jailed early friday morning for an alleged dui and disorderly conduct. according to the police report, while toth was given a sprite test, reese claimed he was not a real police officer so she was handcuffed but not before telling the officer, quote, do you know my name? >> that never works. >> you're about to find out who i am, end quote. in a statement witherspoon said she clearly had too much to drink and is deeply embarrassed. >>> three doors down bassisted to harrell was charged with vehicular homicide after causing a fatal crash that killed a 47-year-old man. harrell was intoxicated and also in possession of over 30 assorted prescription pills. >>> in another entertainment news, "oblivion" easily took first at the box office with $38 million. jennifer lawrence presented bill clinton with a glaad media award and ended up flubbing the president's name. >> we are happy to present glaad advocate change award to president glib -- bill clinton. >> it happens to all of us, you know. it comes up, yo
at the same time. people can also fork out $500 to attend a joe montana autograph signing or $150 to see jim harbaugh at a stadium event. the new stadium will cost $1.2 billion when all is said and done. >>> sal, everything okay in san jose? >> yes, it is. it is a little bit slower than it was. northbound as you drive up through downtown and get into the valley, it will be slow. but we don't have any major crashes on the way. just people getting back to work and we don't have -- we don't see anything really terrible here. the traffic continues to slow on 101 as well by the way getting up to the 880 interchange. we had an earlier crash at the toll plaza. they had to get those cars out of the way. for a while, even the carpool lanes were slowing down. it does look like they've cleared the crash and the traffic is beginning to recover. southbound 880, there was a crash at the bottom of the ramp. 880, it's been causing slow traffic on the nimitz freeway. 7:38. let's go to steve. >>> clear skies, not much of a breeze. hardly anything at all. at the surface, almost everyone says calm. toughest for
with international security expert with the mit security studies program, dr. jim walsh. have you done any studies as far as cost/benefit? because that's the other thing i'm concerned about, the ramping-up of security and the billions of dollars being spent. is it being spent with some benefit? >> yeah, it's a great question. i was in boston on 9/11 sitting in front of a camera like this talking about the challenges that day. and you know, i find myself 12 years later in the same situation. and in that intervening time, we've spent a lot of money and a lot of time and effort trying to improve security and trying to train, prepare, implement rules that would make the country safer. and so i have two reactions to what you're saying. on the one hand it seems evident to me, as i've watched events unfold this week in boston, that we have learned. we are better at this than we were before. that's not to blame folks on 9/11. that was a different scale attack. it's the first time we dealt with it. any time you deal with something the first time you're not going to be very good at it. but it's clear that w
three deaths. cnn's jim spellman is in peoria, illinois. >> good morning, christine. you can see the waters coming up here. this is not too unusual here but it's got about another two feet to go. so far these sandbag levees are holding. they hope that remains the case. from north dakota to indiana, to mississippi. flad watches and warning throughout the middle of the country as rain water from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the rising illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move back into their home of 13 years. you were prepared, but what is it like to actually watch your home go under water? >> it's dev
writing. he has been questioned since yesterday. cnn international security analyst jim walsh is joining us with more on what's going on. one of the key questions, the weapons that they have, the weapons that eventually killed an m.i.t. police officer, seriously injured another local law enforcement officer. do we have any idea where they got those weapons? >> not yet. and i think that question also extends to the explosives, as well. but this is an investigation pursuing lots of lines of inquiry both foreign and domestic. i would have to guess, though, that rather than risk acquiring weapons and explosives from abroad, it's much more likely they were acquired domestically. >> these two guys apparently didn't have much money, but enough to buy explosives, pressure cookers, a rifle, long rifle according to the watertown police chief i spoke with. other weapons, as well. >> i'm sure they're already well into the suspect's computer files and financial records. we're getting a mixed picture because on the one hand, they seem to have had a modest style of living. on the other hand, there is t
will have one of the echo creators of jim chapin will be here to talk to read his new project. we will see you here tomorrow. "the willis report" as telling a next. ♪ gerri: hello, everybody. i'm gerri willis. tonight on "the willis report" budget cuts bite at airports across the country and passengers feel it. >> i got here and they said that the flight was canceled. gerri: the old adage, sell in may and go away, but how did you invest the right way this year? we will show you how. your boss snooping under facebook and twitter. are your privacy rights gone for good? we are on the case tonight on "the willis report." ♪ gerri: tonight's top story, delays at airports coast to coast. according to the faa, flights into new york, baltimore, and washington are delayed because of not enough controllers on hand to monitor the busy corridors. joining me now, president of boy group international and erik hanson, director of domestic policy for the u.s. travel association. welcome to you both. i will start with you, mike. what do you make of this? the fda is saying many of these delays are two ho
this morning with more rain sadly in the forecast. i feel terrible saying that. cnn's jim spellman is in one of those towns. he's in peoria, illinois. jim, people there are looking at water levels, i understand, that haven't been this high in more than 60 years. >> since the 1940s since the illinois river here in peoria came up this high. but it's not just peoria. rivers across the midwest are flooding. from north dakota to indiana to mississippi, flood watches and warnings throughout the middle of the country, as rainwater from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the risele illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move ba
f. kennedy. you're here at history, the cold war, hollywood and beyond. and i'm jim rain yes. i am a media writer and more recently political writer "los angeles times." i want to make a first announcement. first, everybody turn all your cell phones. just turn them off. even if they're on vibrate. richard is particularly sensitive. he won't like that if a cell phone goes off, he will hunt you down and he will correct it. after the session, like after most of our sessions here, there are going to be signings of the books you're going to hear about today. and the signing area is area one, which you can look on a map or someone out here can direct you. so, that's all. you're also not supposed to record this. i'm going to introduce our three panelists, starting in the middle with jon wiener. jon teaches history at the ic irvine, he host as weekly radio program, wednesdays at 4:00 p.m. on kpfk, 90.7fm. guest moan for suing the fbi for their files on john lennon. that story was told in the book, give me some truth, the john lennon fbi files. his most recent book is how we forget the cold
jim harbaugh at stadium preview event. the new stadium will cost $1.2 billion when all is said and done. >>> your time is 6:07. there will soon be more options if you ride the ferry between south san francisco and the east bay. starting next monday, they are adding a 6:20 p.m. trip. right now the last ferry leaves at 5:20. now ridership has been down so the ferry operators are hoping that adding more evening trips will attract more commuters. they also hope to attract more tourists and school trips. >>> we are looking at the bridge pam and dave. and westbound bay bridge is becoming more crowded as you come up to the pay gates. even though the metering lights are not on. that is why you have that big empty spot there for the fast track. but once they turn the metering lights on at 6:15 that empty spot will go away. looking at the san mateo bridge it looks pretty good. there was a car fire westbound 92 near industrial. it's on the shoulder. could cause slow traffic on the way to the san mateo bridge. this morning if you are driving on 92 over to 101 traffic there looks good. 6:08
joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim -- the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spaulding and the heritage foundation itself so valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case on conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, in outspoken partisanship is what almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on both sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. but negativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that liberals are for things, and conse
it and start over, not expand it bret? >> bret: all right, jim. thank you. the treasury department says the internal revenue service the irs overpaid up to $13.6 billion in tax credits designed for low income families last year. the report finds the irs in violation of requirements that it set and meet payment reduction targets that it set and meet payment reduction targets. still ahead, emotions come to the surface over boston and immigration reform. first after a week of domestic turmoil, the president turns his focus to international turmoil. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. happening in that department. >> while the president responded to domestic terrorism in boston last week and monitored the search for suspects,
thing in the world can happen to a city and dumb sportscasters will go, three hours, jim, this city forget there was a nuclear blast. >> something different was going on there. >> here, it can only happen in boston because boston is a one sports team town. at the end of the day, the sox that pull the entire team together. >> fenway. >> and fenway, the cathedral to a city. it had to be an amazing day there. >> it was. it was an amazingly emotional afternoon. it was a cathartic moment. a baseball game happened to have been played but it was if a tiny basilica on the back bay and the region was attracted to it. the suspected suspect had been successfully captured the evening before. neil diamond called the red sox switchboard. >> are you kidding me? >> called the red sox switchboard and said i'm in town, my name is neil diamond. i'd like to come and sing the song and he showed up. >> wow. >> to the surprise -- >> which, of course, people are watching that don't know, that's been a tradition. >> yeah, for a long, long time, many years. middle of the eighth inning, they sing it. >> it's
that i served in the senate choking or half joking that jim demint should run for president. this is not exactly what i had in mind. perhaps he misunderstood me. the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like max balding and the heritage foundation so valuable. you are sharing assistance on making a positive case for conservatives, what conservatives are for. in washington is common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats are opposed to each other in an outspoken partisanship. it is what almost gets the most headlines. this negativity is not appealing on both sides. that helps explain why the government is increasingly held in such beauregard by the american people. for the left, the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. negativity on the right to my mind makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative liberals are for things and conservatives are against things. when we concede this narrative w
that an agreement and all the responsibility for the gaza strip and hamas? >> good question. >> jim, the microphone is coming. >> good to see you again. as you knoi m believer in when yowritwhen you said d so forgive me for what i'm about to say that i'm very frustrated middle east peace activist for those of you that money i've been involved in this for over 23 years trying to organize the churches in this area and have spoken in other parts of the country as well. so, with that in mind please forgive me because this is a harsh question you as well as everyone in this room i think you are all living in a fantasy and i am, too and here is the problem. in your presentation, you talked about the arab street and how connected they are and you're absolutely right. but you didn't with the public opinion in this country. you have got to. we are democracy and we are not disconnected from the public opinion. when you look as i have done at public opinion onisrael and palestine for the last 20 years, guess what, over 50% of americans support israel. less than 10% with a few exceptions, the war was one of th
that this is the law of the land and going forward i think you will see that. >> host: one question from jim. he writes i'm 62 in good health, why not just go without until something comes of? >> guest: one reason is you will have to pay a fine. it's low in the first year, only $95. it goes up in a few years to 2% of hearing, or $700 or if you sign up for coverage although people worry the penalties are too low. but like anyone, as my mother used to tell me don't go a day without health insurance. you never know when you are going to have a concussion and you never know when you're going to be in a car accident. is it really a risk you want to take? >> host: going to ted from huntington new york on our republican line. good morning, you're on with jenny gold. >> caller: good morning. i would like to know about the policy you're in new york. i want to move out of new york. can this policy follow me you know to another state? or if -- >> host: do you have to change policies with each state you are in? is that what you're asking? >> caller: yes. >> guest: the thing about this lot is it's a state-by-state
of the other questions have been asked. mouest -- yesterday in tntitellige had a briefing by jim clapper on thedg goingforwd. he produced a chart which basically showed, started with fy 2012 and show the effects of the various -- the first sequester and the ongoing sequester, the president's budget and other things that have affected that. it was a very powerful chart. i would ask of you could check with him, perhaps, chart number 11. visual a similar breakdown of what your budget thes like, including sequester on an ongoing basis. what does it do if we don't do anything about it? filed the suit for richelieu -- i found this information to be ry important. the munitions in the amount of funds available. the hobbled to see that data over the next 10 years, building in different places. look at the chart and you'll see what i am saying. >> we will. on thisther comment will sequester and budget. know this as well as i do. one of the first things you have to do in this situation is deferred maintenance. that is not saving. a cost someone will have to pay in the future. i am sure you agree. >
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20